Tlaxiaco

Tlaxiaco is about a three-hour colectivo ride from Oaxaca City in the Mixteca Alta. It will cost you around 120 pesos (less than $10 USD) to get there. Vans carrying passengers and cargo depart on the hour from Oaxaca and there are a few companies that will take you virtually anywhere in the state for a modest fee. I suggest getting to the colectivo stand a bit early to lay claim on a seat with a little leg room. Our kneecaps were crammed against the seats in front of us until passengers vacated the roomy front row about 30 minutes outside Tlaxiaco. I would also recommend getting a window seat if possible to take advantage of the panoramic mountain views along the way.
We made the same voyage last summer, but were only in Tlaxiaco for lunch before we boarded a taxi bound for San Juan Mixtepec. This time, we were in town for a couple of days and I was able to get some of the photos that I wanted to take last year – most importantly a lingerie shop with some suggestive artwork on the exterior wall.
We arrived in Tlaxiaco on Friday afternoon and stayed at the Hotel del Portal, which is located on the zócalo. We immediately dropped our backpacks in the room scouted out a place to eat and drink a few beers. Tlayudas San Jacinto is the jam. The interior of the restaurant is cluttered with an array of interesting old junk hanging from the walls and the ceiling. They also craft about a dozen different flavors of mezcal ranging from Jamaica to guava. A wood-burning oven cooks all the items on the restaurant’s short menu and the folks who own the place are friendly and knowledgeable about the city. They also gave us a map of Tlaxiaco that contained some valuable coupons for local businesses.
Overnight, a multitude of vendors arrived and set up the weekly tianguis in the center of the city. When we departed the hotel on Saturday morning, we stepped into a sprawling market where almost anything you can imagine is for sale. We carried away a molcajete in the shape of a pig, a terra cotta cazuela and an embroidered cloth to keep our tortillas warm. The return trip to Oaxaca is a breeze. Just listen for a guy yelling “İOAXACA!” outside a colectivo stand. Buen viaje.

_DSC0691

_DSC0685

_DSC0683

_DSC0675

_DSC0647

_CSC0702

_DSC0626

_DSC0667

_DSC0666

_DSC0635

_DSC0621

_CSC0692

Advertisements

6 thoughts on “Tlaxiaco

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s